Lady Brigade Blog

The World War II Documentary about PTSD that you never saw. June 04 2017

“Let There Be Light” (also known by at PMF 5019 by the U.S. Army) is a documentary film directed by John Huston, an American filmmaker who served in World War II.

It was banned for more than 30 Years by the U.S Army and not released until the 1980’s.

Let there be light ptsd wwII movie image

The film was banned because it was deemed to be demoralizing to future recruits. (However, the military said it was actually to protect the privacy of those featured in the film.) In 1981 the ban was lifted and released for public screenings, but the quality of the film had deteriorated and the audio was so distorted, that it was nearly impossible to understand any of the film. Luckily, in 2010 it was selected by the Library of Congress to be preserved and restored and re-released in May 2012.

This film is a powerful reminder that the battle is not over after the war ends and the soldiers, in any era, in any conflict, are those who carry lifelong the scars with them. 

 

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What would you want the public to know about veterans? November 07 2015


This November, Nadine Noky, the founder of Lady Brigade will be speaking publicly on her military experience and what it means for her to be a veteran; However, she knows she is only one person within a vast community of brave men and women, all of whom have varying degrees of experiences and thoughts that are equally, if not more important than here own. Her goal during this November and moving forward, is to share the voices of other veterans, to give every veteran an opportunity to be heard.

If there is one thing you could share about being a veteran, what would it be?

Email your response to: info@ladybrigade.com along with your name, branch of service, years of service (feel free to submit a photo too!) (Example: Jane Smith, US Army 2002-2007) and Ms. Noky will work to make all your comments heard this November.  

**** Please note, by submitting an email response, you are agreeing to share your comments publicly and Lady Brigade may use your email submission for future blogs, articles and publications that relate to sharing veteran experiences. 

 

 

 
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I never thought I’d say this, but I miss the military. May 28 2015 7 Comments

While I enjoyed being in the military, I disliked the feeling of being tied down; carrying the weight of one decision I had made that essentially affected my life, at least, for the next couple of years.  I can’t think of many other jobs that require you to sign a contract to stay for X amount of years, save for something like signing a music contract (I wish) or, you know, playing for the Yankees. So, a few months before I got out I couldn’t wait; I was excited!  I was looking forward to a new chapter in my life, and I recall thinking a number of times, “I will never, EVER miss the Army or this place” As it turned out, I was wrong.  I do miss it, and here are a just few reasons why:

 

(Image Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/image/303388/army-reserve-2010-best-warrior-competition-army-physical-fitness-test#.VWaGGFxVikrby SFC Mark Burrell, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.)

Fitness

Although I desperately try to stay in shape now, it was so much easier when someone else told me to exercise. Exercising at 6:30am was tough, especially if it was a late night.  However, I figured that if I was out of bed and on the field, I would get the most out of it.  I pushed myself every morning and many evenings to be in the best shape of my life. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy when it isn’t part of your work day.

  

(Image Source: https://flic.kr/p/6SWzFD Phillip Stewart identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.)

Food

I don’t care what you say, even if the food wasn’t great, you pretty much always had access to a meal cooked for you. Even an MRE required little preparation: just heat and eat. And yes, I will still trade you my M&M’s for your peanut butter.

 

Uniforms

If you are lucky enough in the civilian sector to get a uniformed job, cherish it, don’t take it for granted! I always knew what to wear every day; no guess work.  No matching, no ironing, no color coordinating, no high heels.  You get the point.  It was easier, and let’s face it, much more comfortable!

 

(Image Source:: https://flic.kr/p/8cG9uK By: DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Angelita M. Lawrence, U.S. Air Force. DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Angelita M. Lawrence, U.S. Air Force.)

Education

Although I took a handful of college courses while I was enlisted, I was an idiot for not taking more. Free. College. Classes.  A perk provided while on active duty.  Sure, it’s tough to balance work with school, but it’s worth it when you realize that the benefits far outweigh the negatives (especially when one is temporary and the other is permanent. I seriously miss this perk, and yes it is true, I used the G.I Bill after leaving the service to earn a degree, I only imagine how much further I could have gone, had I dedicated more time to my education while I was still serving.

 

(Image Source: https://www.dvidshub.net/news/148972/leadership-gives-holiday-gift-barracks-marines photo by: by Cpl Unique B. Roberts)

Free Housing

Before someone says it, yes, you were charged some crazy, minuscule food/housing fee when you first joined the military and stayed in the barracks, but in all seriousness, where else do you get a furnished place and three meals for just a few dollars a day? Some days when I’m paying my rent, food, utilities, and clothing, I miss those simple days- - Minus the random G.I Parties.

 

Vacation Time / Leave

Since I have left the military, I have not had a civilian job that has ever provided me 30 days of paid vacation a year. At my last corporate job, it was a luxury just to have 2 weeks paid vacation a year and most of those days were on reserve for when my son fell sick.  Having 30 days a year, plus additional 3-4 day weekends, made visiting friends and family much more frequent and easier occurrence than now.

 

 

(Image Source:: https://flic.kr/p/8kxH4n Photographer: unknown)

Friendship

Friendship has to be at the top of my list of things that I miss the most. Let’s face it: if and when you prepare to go to war with a group of strangers, you pretty much form an instant bond and friendship that no one else in the civilian world can understand.  For most of us, these friendships literally meant laying your life on the line for someone else. Most of my closest friendships to this day are a result of my time in the military and I treasure them above all else.

"Please excuse the typos - I'm an artist, not a writer" 

-Nadine Noky, Army Veteran & Founder of LadyBrigade.com

Also, if you are a lady veteran, don't forget to shop the store! 

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